Business Casual Apparel?

I have a supper tonight with some members of the Indianapolis colts and the outfit is business casual. I purchased a polo from aeropostale and have some dress khakis as well as dress shoes? That’s fine, as long as the polo isn’t too sporty. You can wear a button down clothing also. Reply: Yes, you can wear that. Reply: Don’t wear Khakis. Wear a dark pinstripe pant with a good heel. I’m not just a huge enthusiast of Aero photos but if it is nice (and in a good color) use it. Reply: That needs to be just fine. Reply: I would go with a button up a shirt instead. A little more business like, but informal with the khakis still.

In addition, the FTC’s Mail or Telephone Order Merchandise Rule (“Mail Order Rule”) can be applied when a consumer places an order by email, phone, fax, or computer. Beneath the Rule, a company must have an acceptable basis for thinking that it can ship the merchandise within the time period mentioned in the advertisement.

If the advertisement doesn’t specify a period, the business must have an acceptable basis for thinking that it can deliver within thirty days. The Mail Order Rule applies equally to online marketers. To find out more, ask the FTC for A Business Guide to the Federal Trade Commission’s Mail or Telephone Order Merchandise Rule and A Business Checklist for Direct Marketers. Companies that advertise online also should get a duplicate of Selling on the web: Prompt Delivery Rules.

In addition, the Direct Marketing Association, a trade group for users of the immediate marketing industry, has voluntary suggestions on honest business practices. Is it okay for an organization to “dried out test” a product? Although the Mail Order Rule doesn’t specifically deal with this situation, the FTC has released an advisory opinion that such ads must clearly disclose to consumers the fact that the merchandise is only planned and may not ever be delivered. To find out more, ask the FTC for A Business Guide to the Federal Trade Commission’s Mail or Telephone Order Merchandise Rule. Any kind of rules regarding advertisements for “negative option” programs?

The FTC’s Negative Option Rule applies to sellers of subscription programs who ship merchandise like books or compact discs to consumers who have agreed beforehand to become clients. The Rule requires that ads obviously and disclose material information about the terms of the plan conspicuously. Further, once consumers consent to enroll, the business must notify them before shipping to allow them to decline the merchandise. Even if an automatic shipment or continuity program doesn’t fall within the specifics of the Negative Option Rule, companies should be cautious to obviously disclose the terms and conditions of the program before billing consumers or charging their bank cards.

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For more info, ask the FTC for the Negative Option Rule. When can an organization advertise something as “new”? The answer depends upon how the ad uses the word “new.” For example, under the guidelines governing the identification of textiles, fabric can’t be advertised as “new” if it’s been reclaimed or resign. The guidelines governing advertising claims for tires prohibit the use of the term “new” to spell it out retreads.

However, when no specific legislation applies, each full case must be looked at within the context of the advertisement. At least one-FTC advisory opinion has suggested a six-month limit on the utilization of the term when advertising the introduction of a “new” product not previously on the marketplace. Are there any standards governing the advertising of prices?

The same requirements for truthfulness apply when companies make claims about price comparisons, “sale” prices, and the like. For more information, ask the FTC for the Guides Against Deceptive Pricing. Since many prices issues involve local procedures, you also may choose to contact the Attorney General’s office in the state(s) where you plan to market.


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